IIPC Debate 2 December

IIPC debate: Wednesday 2.12., 16:15
Gender and Taste in 1970s Rock Criticism
Sarah Hill, Cardiff University                                                                        

Progressive rock is a genre primarily populated by men, whether as musicians, producers, or audience members. As a genre marketed less for bodily engagement than for cerebral pleasure, it is worth noting that the early years of prog rock coincided with both the rise of rock journalism – another field populated largely by men, who valorised the ‘authentic’ over the ‘pretentious’ – and the nascent Women’s Liberation Movement. In this paper I will explore these intersections in the reception of two canonical recordings from the mid-1970s, chronicle the critical language used to describe prog rock in the UK and US music press, and chart the ways in which women’s musical tastes were alternately defined and stereotyped in the early-1970s. I will then turn to reviews of prog rock written by women critics, with a view toward understanding the role of second-wave feminism in the expressions of women’s critical thoughts in mainstream music magazines, and the curation of taste in women’s magazines of the early 1970s. 

Dr Sarah Hill is currently Senior Lecturer in Music at Cardiff University and Co-ordinating Editor of the journal Popular Music. She has published on issues of popular music historiography, popular music and politics, and popular music and cultural identity, particularly as it relates to the Welsh language. Her most recent monograph was San Francisco and the Long 60s (Bloomsbury, 2016), and she is currently editing a collection of essays on one-hit wonders and, with Professor Allan Moore, the Oxford Handbook of Progressive Rock. In April she will take a new post as Associate Professor of Popular Music and Fellow of St Peter’s College, Oxford.

Time: Dec 2, 2020 04:00 PM Helsinki

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IIPC Debates Nov 25 (Tore Størvold), Dec 2 (Sarah Hill), Dec 7 (Mathias Bonde Korsgaard), Dec 8 (Lori Burns)

Warm welcome to our online IIPC Debates (Zoom details for Dr Størvold available in this post, others will follow near the presentations)!

IIPC debate: Wednesday 25.11, 16.15
Nordic noir television music: Sounding an Arctic Scandinavia in Trapped
Tore Størvold, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

The Icelandic television crime drama Trapped (“Ófærð”, 2015), has become an international success that continues to impact the circulation of images and myths about Iceland in popular culture. This paper highlights aspects of its audiovisual aesthetics that construct a version of Iceland in line with current national aspirations and geopolitical rhetoric. To this end, I focus on the show’s opening title sequence, where many of the key visual and musical features are distilled in a gripping montage featuring music by the composer Jóhann Jóhannsson (1969–2018). The analysis focuses on the use of voice, string instruments, and aspects of studio production that enjoy a lineage within the genre of Nordic noir television music. In Trapped, these musical details are employed in new ways in order to provide an audiovisual narrative of Iceland as an “Arctic Scandinavia”.

Tore Størvold is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Music, Norwegian University of Science and Technology. His research on contemporary music and culture in Iceland has appeared in the journals Popular Music and Popular Music and Society. His current research project deals with musical strategies for promoting ecological knowledge of the oceans. He holds a PhD in musicology from the University of Oslo. 

Topic: IIPC debate: Tore Størvold, Nordic noir television music:

Time: Nov 25, 2020 04:00 PM Helsinki

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IIPC debate: Wednesday 2.12., 16:15
Gender and Taste in 1970s Rock Criticism
Sarah Hill, Cardiff University                                                                        

Progressive rock is a genre primarily populated by men, whether as musicians, producers, or audience members. As a genre marketed less for bodily engagement than for cerebral pleasure, it is worth noting that the early years of prog rock coincided with both the rise of rock journalism – another field populated largely by men, who valorised the ‘authentic’ over the ‘pretentious’ – and the nascent Women’s Liberation Movement. In this paper I will explore these intersections in the reception of two canonical recordings from the mid-1970s, chronicle the critical language used to describe prog rock in the UK and US music press, and chart the ways in which women’s musical tastes were alternately defined and stereotyped in the early-1970s. I will then turn to reviews of prog rock written by women critics, with a view toward understanding the role of second-wave feminism in the expressions of women’s critical thoughts in mainstream music magazines, and the curation of taste in women’s magazines of the early 1970s. 

Dr Sarah Hill is currently Senior Lecturer in Music at Cardiff University and Co-ordinating Editor of the journal Popular Music. She has published on issues of popular music historiography, popular music and politics, and popular music and cultural identity, particularly as it relates to the Welsh language. Her most recent monograph was San Francisco and the Long 60s (Bloomsbury, 2016), and she is currently editing a collection of essays on one-hit wonders and, with Professor Allan Moore, the Oxford Handbook of Progressive Rock. In April she will take a new post as Associate Professor of Popular Music and Fellow of St Peter’s College, Oxford.


IIPC debate:  Monday 7.12., 16:15 
Spatial Imagination in Contemporary Music Video
Mathias Bonde Korsgaard, Aarhus University

When compared to other audiovisual media, music video has occasionally been credited with opting for “a different articulation of space and time” (Shaviro 2017, 58). Scholars have noted how music videos “expand and transcend our conceptions of temporality and spatiality” (Frahm, 2010, 155), maintaining that music video space is often “fragmented and unstable” (Vernallis 2004, 116) or “hybrid” (Willis 2005; Korsgaard 2017ff). This spatial hybridity can be taken to mean two different things. Firstly, on a general level any music video represents space on two planes at once: an auditory/musical space alongside a visual/cinematic space, with the interrelation between these two creating a distinctly composite “audiovisual space” (Lexmann 2008, 49). Secondly, the notion of spatial hybridity also more specifically implies that music videos are visually discontinuous and fragmented with different spaces and image-planes frequently intermingling and colliding. This hybrid and composite nature of music video necessarily calls for an equally hybrid and composite theoretical and methodological approach to the analysis of music video spaces. Departing from an interdisciplinary theoretical framework, this lecture will engage with spatial imagination in contemporary music video, detailing how music video spaces are characterized by having become increasingly heterogeneous in the digital age.

References

Frahm, Laura (2010), “Liquid Cosmos. Movement and Mediality in Music Video”, in Rewind. Play. Fast Forward. The Past, Present and Future of the Music Video. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 155-178.

Korsgaard, Mathias Bonde (2017), Music Video After MTV: Audiovisual Studies, New Media, and Popular Music. London & New York: Routledge.

Lexmann, Juraj (2008), Audiovisual Media and Music Culture. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Shaviro, Steven (2017), Digital Music Videos. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.

Vernallis, Carol (2004), Experiencing Music Video: Aesthetics and Cultural Context. New York: Columbia University Press.

Willis, Holly (2005), New Digital Cinema. London & New York: Wallflower.

Bio

Mathias Bonde Korsgaard is assistant professor of film and media at School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University, Denmark. He is the author of Music Video After MTV (Routledge, 2017) and has published widely on music video, film, and audiovisual studies. He is editor in chief of the Danish online film journal 16:9.

IIPC debate: Tuesday 8.12., 16:15
Female Metal Vocal Expression. Jinjer: Progressive Metal and Alternative Femininity
Lori Burns, University of Ottawa

Lori Burns is Professor and Director of the School of Music at the University of Ottawa. Her interdisciplinary research (funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada) merges cultural theory and musical analysis to explore representations of gender in the lyrical, musical and visual texts of popular music. She has published articles in edited collections published by Ashgate, Bloomsbury, Cambridge, Garland, Oxford, Routledge, and the University of Michigan Press, as well as in leading journals (Popular Music, Popular Music and Society, The Journal for Music, Sound, and Moving Image, Studies in Music, Music Theory Spectrum, Music Theory Online and The Journal for Music Theory). Her book on popular music, Disruptive Divas: Critical and Analytical Essays on Feminism, Identity, and Popular Music (Routledge Press, 2002) won the Pauline Alderman Award from the International Alliance for Women in Music (2005). She was a founding co-editor of the Tracking Pop Series of the University of Michigan Press and is now serving as co-editor of the Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series. She is also Associate Editor of the journal Music Theory Spectrum.

Abstract:

In the context of female performance in heavy metal bands—globally at the level of 3% (Berkers & Schaap 2018, 103-104)—my recent work examines the contributions of female vocalists to the metal subgenres. Using case studies, I realize two research objectives: 1) to analyze multimodal performance expression of female vocalists in metal music; and 2) to complicate the conventional understanding of extreme gender subjectivities (hypermasculinity and hyperfemininity) in metal subgenres. Heavy metal scholarship affirms the genre to be dominated by male performers (Walser 1993; Weinstein 2000) and points to the preponderance of patriarchal values and hypermasculinity, with the performance content contributing to an aesthetic production of misogyny, power, and intensity (Barron 2007; Kummer 2016; Overell 2013, 2014; Rafalovich 2006; Walser 1993; Weinstein 1991, 2009). The notion of heavy metal as a hegemonic discourse exhibiting “fantasies of masculine virtuosity and control” (Walser 1993, 108-109) has been queried by recent scholars who reveal metal to support a range of gendered and sexualized subjectivities (Clifford-Napoleone 2015; Kahn-Harris 2007). I examine how extreme vocalists navigate the hypermasculine discourse of death metal to express an alternative gendered subjectivity. Recognizing the dearth of music analysis for extreme vocal expression (Smialek 2015), and a recent appeal for scholars to “ground a constructed perspective of masculinity from examples in heavy metal itself” (Scott 2016, 122), this study analyzes the work of a female extreme metal vocalist within the subgenre of progressive metal. I adopt a rigorous analytic model for words, music, and images and illustrate how the expressive strategies of Tatiana Shmailyuk (of the band Jinjer) challenges the hegemonic norms of metal.

Cfp: EUPOP 2020 (deadline 29 Feb!)

EUPOP 2020

Jagiellonian University, July 22nd – 24th, 2020

Deadline: 29th February, 2019

Individual paper and panel contributions are welcomed for the ninth annual international conference of the European Popular Culture Association (EPCA), to be held at Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland, July 22nd – 24th, 2020.

EUPOP 2020 will explore European popular culture in all its various forms. This includes, but is by no means limited to, the following topics: Climate Change in Popular Culture, European Film (past and present), Television, Music, Costume and Performance, Celebrity, The Body, Fashion, New Media, Popular Literature and Graphic Novels, Queer Studies, Sport, Curation, and Digital Culture. We also welcome abstracts which reflect the various ways of how the idea of relationship between Europe and popular culture could be formed and how the current tur-moil in European identity (e.g. the legacy of totalitarianism and fascism), union, its borders and divisions are portrayed in popular cultural themes and contents.

Papers and complete panels for all strands will be subject to peer review. Proposals for individ-ual presentations must not exceed 20 minutes in length, and those for panels limited to 90 minutes. In the latter case, please provide a short description of the panel along with individual abstracts. Poster presentations and video projections are also warmly welcomed.

There will be opportunities for networking and publishing within the EPCA. Presenters at EUPOP 2020 will be encouraged to develop their papers for publication in a number of Intellect journals, including the EPCA’s Journal of European Popular Culture. A full list of Intellect journals is available at:

https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/index/

Proposals comprising a 300-word abstract, your full name, affiliation, and contact details (as a Word-file attachment, not a PDF) should be submitted to Kari Kallioniemi (kakallio@utu.fi) by 29.02.2020. Receipt of proposals will be acknowledged via e-mail, and the decision of ac-ceptance will be notified within two weeks of submission.

The conference draft program will be announced in May 2020, along with the conference regis-tration and accommodation details. The likely conference fee will be 150 euros (student), and 200 euros (other). The fee includes coffees, lunches, evening reception & dinner, and EPCA Membership (includes subscription to the European Journal of Popular Culture, Intellect Press).

The keynote speakers:

Dr Tomasz Z. Majkowski (Jagiellonian University)

Dr Mari Pajala (University of Turku)

Professor Małgorzata Sugiera (Jagiellonian University)

The European Popular Culture Association

The European Popular Culture Association (EPCA) promotes the study of popular culture from, in, and about Europe. Popular culture involves a wide range of activities, material forms and audiences. EPCA aims to examine and discuss these different aspects as they relate both to Europe and to Europeans across the globe, whether contemporary or historical.

EUPOP 2020 is organised by:

European Popular Culture Association (EPCA): https://epcablog.wordpress.com/

International Institute for Popular Culture (IIPC): http://iipc.utu.fi/

Kind Regards,

EPCA President, Kari Kallioniemi, kakallio@utu.fi

EPCA Vice-President, Pamela Church Gibson, pamelachurchgibson@gmail.com

EPCA Secretary, Kimi Kärki, kierka@utu.fi

EPCA Membership Secretary, Graham Roberts, grahamroberts83@gmail.com

Local Organiser Contact: Anna Svetlova, annaswietlowa@gmail.com and Olga Grzelak,

olgagrzelak@gmail.com

Imagined and real Talking Machines

This Saturday February 22nd Science Cafe’ will open the 2020 Season with a super-interesting talk by Docent Kimi Kärki from the University of Turku, who will talk about “Imagined and real Talking Machines” as usual in Koulu, History Class from 17.00 till 19.00.

Docent Kärki will be talking about the research project he is currently involved in (“Talking Machines. Electronic voice and the interpretation of emotions and self-understanding in human-machine communication in 1960-2020”, funded by Kone Foundation), that studies speech audio as an interface between human and machine. The cultural history of such technologies is partially built on imagined futures within the works of speculative fiction, of which Kärki will focus on science fiction films. He will also talk about the transhumanism as the current meeting point of speculative popular culture and scientific advancements.

As usual, the presentation is for non-experts and is followed by a Q&A session. Come and bring your friends! More info: https://sciencecafeturku.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR2I9Y08fKTeAqlCrGoJjSo8E1EkwFaLGPFRIK_RJkD_WlxyF6vAj2AbER8

 

Death and the Apocalypse in Popular Culture

Bar Ö, Turku (Linnankatu 7), Tue the 18th February, 2020. 6-9 pm.

A pre-event for the Histories of Death symposium (University of Turku, https://sites.utu.fi/jmc/histories-of-death/), co-organized with the International Institute for Popular Culture (IIPC, http://iipc.utu.fi/).

The talks start at 19:00 sharp, but feel free to come earlier! Even if it’s about death and the apocalypse, there will be good time & lively discussion. Free entry.

Speakers:

MA Marika Ahonen (Cultural History, University of Turku): Romanticized Death in Popular Music

Dr Kimmo Ahonen (Pori Department, Tampere University): The Images of Collective Death in Science Fiction Movies of the 1950s

Docent Kimi Kärki (Cultural History, University of Turku): Cinematic Talking Machines at the Point of Dying

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/637019213792397/

Rockfestivals: History, Ideology and Content (EDIT: Cancelled due to Coronavirus pandemic)

Rockfestivals: History, Ideology and Content, Seminar for the 50th anniversary of Turku Ruisrock Festival
 
Special IIPC-keynote by Professor Simon Frith (title to be confirmed) and panel including Professor Sara Cohen and Professor Simon Frith (more panelists to be confirmed).
 
Tuesday 14th of April 2020, time 15-17, venue Janus hall, Sirkkala, Kaivokatu 12, Turku.

Cold War, Aesthetics and Popular Culture

IIPC, Media Studies and Musicology Proudly Presents

 

Cold War, Aesthetics and Popular Culture

 

13.12 Sirkkala campus, University of Turku, Janus hall

13.00-13.15 Opening Words: Kari Kallioniemi: Different Cold Wars and their Cultural/Aesthetical Elements

13.15-14.00  Eva Näripea: Otherness in Grigori Kromanov’s The Dead Mountaineer’s Hotel (1979): Bending Genre and Gender

14.00-14.45 John Williamson: The Rearguard of the Revolution?  Communism, the state and musicians in Britain at the start of the Cold War.

14.45-15.15 Coffee

15.15 Snapshots of Cold War Aesthetics in Popular Culture

Pertti Grönholm: Talking machines and total destruction in science fiction

Laura Antola: Soviet Super-Soldiers vs. The Avengers: Superheroes and the end of the Cold War

Kimmo Laine: Cold War Film Compositions

Kimmo Ahonen: Invaders from Mars (1953) and the Fear of Brainwashing

Kari Kallioniemi: ’When the Wind Blows’: Culture and Aesthetics of British Cold War Invasion Fantasies

17.00-18.00 Screening of document ‘Billy Bragg Goes to Moscow’ (dir. Hannu Puttonen, 1989, 45 min.) The director will introduce the piece.

Assessment: 5 op (ECTS) essay, lecture diary or lecture pass (2 op)

If you are interested of submitting an essay or lecture diary, a student can contact the teacher responsible of the marking: Paavo Oinonen (Cultural History), Laura Saarenmaa (Media Studies,  METU1051, METU0146), Kari Kallioniemi, Musicology

CFP: EUPOP 2020

EUPOP 2020
Jagiellonian University, July 22nd – 24th, 2020
Deadline: 29th February, 2019
Individual paper and panel contributions are welcomed for the ninth annual international conference of the European Popular Culture Association (EPCA), to be held at Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland, July 22nd – 24th, 2020.
EUPOP 2020 will explore European popular culture in all its various forms. This includes, but is by no means limited to, the following topics: Climate Change in Popular Culture, European Film (past and present), Television, Music, Costume and Performance, Celebrity, The Body, Fashion, New Media, Popular Literature and Graphic Novels, Queer Studies, Sport, Curation, and Digital Culture. We also welcome abstracts which reflect the various ways of how the idea of relationship between Europe and popular culture could be formed and how the current turmoil in European identity (e.g. the legacy of totalitarianism and fascism), union, its borders and divisions are portrayed in popular cultural themes and contents.
Papers and complete panels for all strands will be subject to peer review. Proposals for individual presentations must not exceed 20 minutes in length, and those for panels limited to 90 minutes. In the latter case, please provide a short description of the panel along with individual abstracts. Poster presentations and video projections are also warmly welcomed.
There will be opportunities for networking and publishing within the EPCA. Presenters at EUPOP 2020 will be encouraged to develop their papers for publication in a number of Intel-lect journals, including the EPCA’s Journal of European Popular Culture. A full list of Intellect journals is available at:
Proposals comprising a 300-word abstract, your full name, affiliation, and contact details (as a Word-file attachment, not a PDF) should be submitted to Kari Kallioniemi (kakallio@utu.fi) by 29.02.2020. Receipt of proposals will be acknowledged via e-mail, and the decision of acceptance will be notified within two weeks of submission.
The conference draft program will be announced in May 2020, along with the conference regis-tration and accommodation details. The likely conference fee will be 150 euros (student), and 200 euros (other). The fee includes coffees, lunches, evening reception & dinner, and EPCA Membership (includes subscription to the European Journal of Popular Culture, Intellect Press).
The keynote speakers:
Dr Tomasz Z. Majkowski (Jagiellonian University)
Professor Mari Pajala (University of Turku)
Professor Małgorzata Sugiera (Jagiellonian University)
The European Popular Culture Association
The European Popular Culture Association (EPCA) promotes the study of popular culture from, in, and about Europe. Popular culture involves a wide range of activities, material forms and audiences. EPCA aims to examine and discuss these different aspects as they relate both to Europe and to Europeans across the globe, whether contemporary or historical.
EUPOP 2019 is organised by:
European Popular Culture Association (EPCA): http://epcablog.wordpress.com/
International Institute for Popular Culture (IIPC): http://iipc.utu.fi/
Kind Regards,
EPCA President, Kari Kallioniemi, kakallio@utu.fi
EPCA Vice-President, Pamela Church Gibson, pamelachurchgibson@gmail.com
EPCA Secretary, Kimi Kärki, kierka@utu.fi
EPCA Membership Secretary, Graham Roberts, grahamroberts83@gmail.com
Local Organiser Contact: Anna Svetlova, annaswietlowa@gmail.com and Olga Grzelak,
olgagrzelak@gmail.com

IIPC Debate 14 November

IIPC debate 106

Thu 14 November, 4-6 pm (Lecture Hall Hovi, V105, Kaivokatu 12, turku)

Professor Susanna Paasonen (University of Turku)

Dr Kylie Jarrett (Maynooth University)

Professor Ben Light (University of Salford)

NSFW!

The hashtag #NSFW (not safe for work) acts as both a warning and an invitation. NSFW tells users, “We dare you to click on this link! And by the way, don’t do it until after work!” Unlike the specificity of movie and television advisories (“suggestive dialogue,” “sexual content”), NSFW signals, nonspecifically, sexually explicit content that ranges from nude selfies to pornography. The debate looks at how and why social media content is tagged “not safe” and shows how this serves to conflate sexual content and risk. More specifically, we argue that the notion of “unsafety” extends beyond the risk of losing one’s job or being embarrassed at work to an unspecified sense of risk attached to sexually explicit media content and sexual communication in general. We further argue against the categorical effacement of sexual content by means of an all-purpose hashtag and urge us to shift considerations of safety from pictorial properties to issues of context and consent.

The debate is also a book launch event for NSFW: Sex, Humor, and Risk in Social Media (MIT Press, 2019, https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/nsfw) co-authored by Paasonen, Jarrett and Light.

Susanna Paasonen is Professor of Media Studies at the University of Turku, Finland. She is the author of Carnal Resonance: Affect and Online Pornography and Many Splendored Things: Thinking Sex and Play.

Kylie Jarrett is Head of the Department of Media Studies at Maynooth University, Ireland, and author of Feminism, Labour and Digital Media: The Digital Housewife.

Ben Light is Professor of Digital Society at the University of Salford, UK, and the author of Disconnecting with Social Networking Sites.